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What Will Sea Level Rise Look Like? (West Coast Edition)

By Nickolay Lamm

Jul

02

2013





San Diego sea level rise at 5 feet, 12 feet, and 25 feet






San Francisco sea level rise at 5 feet, 12 feet, and 25 feet






Venice Beach sea level rise at 5 feet, 12 feet, and 25 feet






Venice Beach sea level rise at 5 feet, 12 feet, and 25 feet






San Diego sea level rise at 5 feet, 12 feet, and 25 feet

People rent storage units as an affordable solution to running out of space for their things, whether it's in their house, office or dorm room. However, space is limited not only for our belongings but where we live as well; unfortunately, there's no storage facility large enough to contain our planet's melting icebergs.

Sea level rise that makes cities uninhabitable is not going to happen in our lifetime, but, it is going to happen sooner or later unless we cut carbon emissions. Our first sea level rise project covered only East Coast cities. I felt it would be fitting to bring attention to sea level rise on the West Coast as well. Because Charleston, SC, may feel the effects of sea level rise more than most, I decided to include that city as well.

The following process was used to illustrate what sea level rise may look like in real life:

1) A stock photo was used as the main canvas.



2) Apple Maps and/or Google Earth told us exactly where this photo was taken.



3) Now that we know the location of this photo, we can find this place on the sea level rise maps – which tell us how much flooding will be at this location. According to sea level rise maps, there will be 5 feet, 12 feet, and 25 feet of sea level rise in front of The Citadel in Charleston.





4) Along with topography maps, we used the following formula to calculate how much water there would be on the ground


Water depth at MHW = SLR - (E - (MHW - NAVD88))


Without going into too much detail, it's simply a formula which takes into account the elevation, high tide, and the amount of sea level rise.


5) The results are illustrations which give us a a glimpse into our potential future.






For high resolution images, comments, or interview requests, please contact nickolaylamm@gmail.com.

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